Economy

Vuvuzelas Banned From "The Game" By Harvard

Sometimes there's a story about an institution or place that just re-affirms all of your secretly held stereotypes about a place. I take a certain amount of glee in such occasions. This is one of them.

The 127th Harvard-Yale football game takes place tomorrow at Harvard. "The Game" the rivalry is one of the oldest in sports. A few enterprising young men saw an opportunity for a little fun, and make some money. They started the "Silence Yale" campaign and started selling Vuvuzelas at 6 bucks a pop. They sold some 2000 of them. Students at Yale responded, buying hundreds of their own.

Apparently, the incredibly loud horns popularized by the World Cup this year, are just a little too, I don't know, exuberant, maybe, for Harvard. From the Boston Herald.

“It has become apparent that some individuals intend to use artificial noisemakers to both disrupt play on the field and detract from the overall fan experience for many spectators,” Harvard’s Associate Director of Athletics Timothy Wheaton wrote in an e-mail to students Tuesday.

It's just the reasoning that makes me chuckle, I can't help it. "The overall fan experience." Didn't seem to hurt the World Cup that much. And then there are these gems. From the Harvard Crimson.

Dunster House UC Representative Annemette H. Harnes ’12 cited further problems with the vuvuzelas.

“There are going to be a lot of alums at The Game, and it would tarnish their experience,” Harnes said.

“Also, people might leave them, and it would be just another thing that would have to be cleaned up afterward.”

And it might be fun. And loud. Ah well, the two students who started it? Well, Messrs. Eric Cervini and Jonathan Davis made a tidy profit on the plastic horns, they sold out before the ban came down.

And as it's Friday, and in honor of the Vuvuzela, turn up your speakers really loud and play this. For freedom.

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