America

The Word From Airports: Things Are OK

Travelers go through a security checkpoint at Reagan National Airport in Washington today.

The scene this morning at a security checkpoint inside Washington's Reagan National Airport. Jewel Samad/Getty hide caption

itoggle caption Jewel Samad/Getty

We still need to get through the afternoon and evening hours, of course, but the sense is building that fliers are making their way through the security checkpoints at the nation's airports on this busy travel day with relative ease. At least, that is, without any more problems than usual on the day before Thanksgiving — and in some cases, with even fewer problems than usually occur on this day.

Throughout the morning, we collected comments and Facebook postings from travelers here, as well as reports from NPR correspondents and other news outlets. And we're still looking for stories.

For now, though, here's a typical message on our Facebook page:

— "Ashley Hairston. ‎1.5 hours on CTA trains to get to O'Hare. Less than 10 minutes to get through TSA checkpoint. Didn't see any protesters. Flights seem to be on time. All in all, pretty good so far! I was more annoyed by the TV crews than going through security. Not much news to report."

According to the Associated Press, there have been few reports of passengers choosing to "opt-out" of full-body scans in favor of pat-downs. A fledgling Internet campaign calling for a National Opt-Out Day to protest new security measures appears to have had little impact so far.

Now, the nation's highways — depending on where you are — can be a much different story. Blizzards in the West have made life very miserable for many. And we've gotten several tips such as this:

— "Dennis Tucker. Anyone traveling I95 should get off at an exit before the DE-MD border toll plaza and go around. It will be a nightmare if you don't."

We'll keep our eyes open. You do that too. Let us know if you run into trouble.

Update at 4 p.m. ET: The news from airports continues to be that lines aren't that long and passengers are moving through easily.

The Denver Post, for example, says "air travelers found few difficulties Wednesday as a busy but calm Denver airport entered its heaviest travel week in history." (At the same time, though, "drivers in parts of Colorado's mountains faced tougher conditions" because of blizzards.)

Gannett News Service's Chuck Raasch just reported on his Facebook page that "Our son, 25, just glided thru LAX (Los Angeles) on the busiest travel day of the year with what he said was the shortest security line he'd seen. Reminder to my fellow media folks: Stop feeding the hype machine. Just because someone calls a boycott to push a cause doesn't mean it's going to happen."

And speaking of that call for fliers to "opt-out" of full-body scans, Georgia Public Broadcasting's Susanna Capelouto notes that at the busiest airport in the world — Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson International — "only about three percent of travelers ... will be asked to go through full-body scanners," meaning that there wasn't much to opt-out of.

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