International

Tony Blair Will Be Questioned Again In Iraq War Inquiry

Tony Blair has been asked to appear for a second time before a committee looking into Britain's role in the Iraq invasion. i i

hide captionTony Blair has been asked to appear for a second time before a committee looking into Britain's role in the Iraq invasion.

Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images
Tony Blair has been asked to appear for a second time before a committee looking into Britain's role in the Iraq invasion.

Tony Blair has been asked to appear for a second time before a committee looking into Britain's role in the Iraq invasion.

Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Members of a British inquiry into the country's involvement in the war in Iraq said today that they are asking former Prime Minister Tony Blair to testify a second time.

The Guardian reports the committee, which was formed by former Prime Minster Gordon Brown, found conflicting evidence after Blair's first appearance:

The inquiry is believed to be concerned about the revelation in documents it released in June. They show that the day before he privately assured Bush he would back US-led military action, Blair was warned by Lord Goldsmith, then attorney general, that an invasion of Iraq would be illegal.

A note from Goldsmith to Blair, marked secret and dated 30 January 2003, stated: "I thought you might wish to know where I stand on the question of whether a further decision of the [UN] security council is legally required in order to authorise the use of force against Iraq." Goldsmith warned Blair: "My view remains that a further [UN] decision is required."

A day after, reports the paper, Blair flew to Washington to see President George Bush, who told him the invasion would proceed with or without U.N. approval. Blair said "he was solidly with the president."

The BBC reports Blair will be appear before the committee January 21. The inquiry has been holding hearings since November.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: