America

'Miraculous' Is Still Word To Use About Giffords' Condition, Doctor Says

Sunday: Flowers, candles, stuffed toys and cards are left at a makeshift memorial outside the Safeway grocery store in Tucson, Ariz. where the Jan. 8 mass shooting took place, i i

hide captionSunday: Flowers, candles, stuffed toys and cards are left at a makeshift memorial outside the Safeway grocery store in Tucson, Ariz. where the Jan. 8 mass shooting took place,

Susan Montoya Bryan/AP
Sunday: Flowers, candles, stuffed toys and cards are left at a makeshift memorial outside the Safeway grocery store in Tucson, Ariz. where the Jan. 8 mass shooting took place,

Sunday: Flowers, candles, stuffed toys and cards are left at a makeshift memorial outside the Safeway grocery store in Tucson, Ariz. where the Jan. 8 mass shooting took place,

Susan Montoya Bryan/AP

Asked just moments ago if he still thinks Rep. Gabrielle Giffords' progress since being shot in the head on Jan. 8 has been "miraculous," Dr. G. Michael Lemole, section chief of neurosurgery at University Medical Center in Tucson just told reporters:

"No change. ... That word still holds very well."

An important next step in her case — gauging her ability to speak — hasn't yet been taken. Dr. Randy Friese, one of the surgeons who performed a tracheotomy on the Democratic congresswoman over the weekend, said because of that procedure she cannot "get air past her vocal cords."

Still, if Giffords does wish to speak, she "certainly could mouth words," Friese added.

In another bit of good news about Giffords, Lemole was asked about word from her husband, Mark Kelly, that she has been able to reach out and give him a neck rub. That, "does imply that she is recognizing [Kelly]," Lemole said, "and interacting in an old familiar way with him." And that is another sign that "higher cognitive levels of function are at least somehow, somewhat preserved."

Giffords and 18 other people were shot in the rampage. Six of the victims died.

(As we said Friday, The Two-Way is "off" today — Martin Luther King Jr. Day — but we wanted to pop in for this update because of the high interest in this story.)

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: