America

Oscar de la Renta Pans First Lady's State Dinner Dress

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama arrive to welcome Chinese President Hu Jintao on the North Portico at the White House for a State Dinner. i i

hide captionPresident Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama arrive to welcome Chinese President Hu Jintao on the North Portico at the White House for a State Dinner.

Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images
President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama arrive to welcome Chinese President Hu Jintao on the North Portico at the White House for a State Dinner.

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama arrive to welcome Chinese President Hu Jintao on the North Portico at the White House for a State Dinner.

Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

For Wednesday's state dinner with Chinese president Hu Jintao, Michelle Obama wore a stunning red and black dress by Alexander McQueen's Sarah Burton.

Well, fashion icon Oscar de la Renta didn't keep his displeasure to himself. He told Women's Wear Daily:

"My understanding," de la Renta told WWD, "is that the visit was to promote American-Chinese trade — American products in China and Chinese products in America. Why do you wear European clothes?"

De la Renta noted that Obama remains a major fashion get, with the power to boost a house's business. "I'm not talking about my clothes, my business. I'm old, and I don't need it. But there are a lot of young people, very talented people here who do," he said.

McQueen who was British died in February of 2010. De la Renta made similar comments about the First Lady's fashion choices in April of 2009. "You don't go to Buckingham Palace in a sweater," he said.

We don't wade in on fashion topics nearly enough to know for certain, but the dress looked good to me. What do you all think?

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