Lance Armstrong Says Govt. Inquiry Into Doping Would 'Vindicate' Him

Lance Armstrong arrives at a training session during a rest day of the 2010 Tour de France. i i

Lance Armstrong arrives at a training session during a rest day of the 2010 Tour de France. Nathalie Magniez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Nathalie Magniez/AFP/Getty Images
Lance Armstrong arrives at a training session during a rest day of the 2010 Tour de France.

Lance Armstrong arrives at a training session during a rest day of the 2010 Tour de France.

Nathalie Magniez/AFP/Getty Images

As we've reported earlier this week, cycling great Lance Armstrong is facing a new round of doping allegations. In a piece published Wednesday, SI claims that after dozens of interviews and reviewing hundreds of pages of documents, they have evidence that Armstrong used performance enhancing drugs before and during his run of seven Tour de France wins.

Today, Armstrong went on the defensive, Tweeting:

Great to hear that @usada is investigating some of @si's claims. I look forward to being vindicated.

Armstrong is referring to the United States Anti-Doping Agency, which, as the AFP reports, has been investigating Armstrong since former teammate Floyd Landis made similar accusations.

ESPN reports that besides that Tweet, Armstrong has said little else:

Armstrong is currently competing in the Tour Down Under in South Australia and has refused to comment on the Sports Illustrated report, other than to say he has nothing to worry about "on any level" from its claims. He would not speak to reporters after the fourth stage on Friday and could not be contacted later in the evening.

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