America

Jobs, The Future And Salmon: Key Words From State Of The Union

Good morning.

Before we move on to other top stories, let's take a quick look at how last night's State of the Union address by President Obama is being portrayed in headlines:

— NPR: "Obama: 'Our Destiny Remains Our Choice' "

The Wall Street Journal: "Obama Gears Up for a Global Challenge"

Los Angeles Times: "Obama says U.S. acts 'together, or not at all' "

Chicago Sun-Times: "Jobs are president's job No. 1"

The New York Times: "Obama Pitches Global Fight for U.S. Jobs in Address"

The Washington Post: " 'Win the future,' Obama implores"

Politico: "In bipartisan tones, Barack Obama challenges GOP"

The Weekly Standard (conservative): "Not A Winning Speech"

— The Huffington Post (liberal) " 'Our Destiny Remains Our Choice' "

And then there's the challenge that NPR put to its Facebook fans to sum up the address in three words. The thousands of submissions were made into a word cloud and this is what it looked like:

We asked our listeners to describe President Barack Obama's State of the Union address in three words. This is a word cloud of the more than 12,000 words we received. i i
NPR/via Wordle
We asked our listeners to describe President Barack Obama's State of the Union address in three words. This is a word cloud of the more than 12,000 words we received.
NPR/via Wordle

Salmon? Oh, yeah. Folks were remembering the funny moment when Obama got laughs from the lawmakers for saying this:

"We live and do business in the Information Age, but the last major reorganization of the government happened in the age of black-and-white TV. There are 12 different agencies that deal with exports. There are at least five different agencies that deal with housing policy. Then there's my favorite example: The Interior Department is in charge of salmon while they're in fresh water, but the Commerce Department handles them when they're in saltwater. I hear it gets even more complicated once they're smoked."

Courtesy of C-SPAN.org's video library, here's what it looked and sounded like when the president talked about salmon:

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