Hawk Caught, Removed From Library Of Congress

Linda Moore, vice president of the Raptor Conservancy of Virginia holds the Cooper's Hawk after its capture. i i

Linda Moore, vice president of the Raptor Conservancy of Virginia holds the Cooper's Hawk after its capture. Abby Brack/Library of Congress hide caption

itoggle caption Abby Brack/Library of Congress
Linda Moore, vice president of the Raptor Conservancy of Virginia holds the Cooper's Hawk after its capture.

Linda Moore, vice president of the Raptor Conservancy of Virginia holds the Cooper's Hawk after its capture.

Abby Brack/Library of Congress

I think this will be the last animal post of the day. We'll see. This "breaking news" is a follow-up to last night's post about a trapped Cooper's Hawk.

The wayward winged predator had been stuck since last week in the Main Reading Room of the Library of Congress. Today it was captured and sent for a rehab stint with the Raptor Conservancy of Virginia.

The capture occurred at 8:30 a.m. ET and took about 25 minutes.

The hawk was found to be in good health and will be released into the wild after it goes through rehab.

Here's how a LOC blog post described the capture:

"The team put a pair of starlings – Frick and Frack, according to their owner – in a trap on a ledge inside the dome and waited, hidden beneath a tarp."

"The starlings saw the hawk poised nearby and froze."

"But the noise of a truck passing by the Jefferson Building startled the pair and caused them to move."

"The motion drew the attention of the hawk: She immediately flew onto the trap, where its talons entangled in the nylon nooses attached to the top of the wire cage."

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