America

Northeast Gets Hit Again: How Sick Of Winter Are You?

Tough going: A woman crosses the streets of Washington, D.C., in the snow on Wednesday (Jan. 26, 2011). i i

Tough going: A woman crosses the streets of Washington, D.C., in the snow on Wednesday (Jan. 26, 2011). Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images
Tough going: A woman crosses the streets of Washington, D.C., in the snow on Wednesday (Jan. 26, 2011).

Tough going: A woman crosses the streets of Washington, D.C., in the snow on Wednesday (Jan. 26, 2011).

Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

Heavy. Wet. Icy.

Ugh.

The storm that swept through parts of the Mid-Atlantic, Northeast and New England yesterday and into this morning wasn't one of those that leaves behind a fluffy white blanket that's kind of fun to play around in.

As the Associated Press says, the region was hit with "an icy mix of snow and rain" that has left hundreds of airplane passengers stranded, about 300,000 customers in and around Washington, D.C., wthout power, and basically ruined today's commute for folks up and down the coast.

The Washington Post calls it "thundersnow" (rumbles were heard in some places) and tells the tale of one commuter who was stuck on a local parkway for 13 hours.

The Philadelphia Inquirer says there was a double whammy in the City of Brotherly Love — an unexpected storm early Wednesday, followed by the bigger one late in the day. It was "as an all-out ambush," the newspaper says.

The New York Times sums up the story this way: "The powerful storm, appearing as a giant white smudge over the Northeast on radar maps, arrived in two parts, coating the region with rain and several inches of snow early Wednesday and then dumping up to an additional foot of snow in some places overnight Thursday."

And the Boston Herald is just fed up with it all: "Snow, Snow Go Away," its headline reads.

Well, what does everyone think?

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