International

Reports: Yemen's President Says He Will Leave Office In 2013

Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh announced he will freeze constitutional changes that would allow him to be  president for life. a controversial April poll. i i

Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh announced he will freeze constitutional changes that would allow him to be president for life. a controversial April poll. Gamal Noman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Gamal Noman/AFP/Getty Images
Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh announced he will freeze constitutional changes that would allow him to be  president for life. a controversial April poll.

Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh announced he will freeze constitutional changes that would allow him to be president for life. a controversial April poll.

Gamal Noman/AFP/Getty Images

Dramatic events continue to rock nations in the Arab world.

The BBC writes that:

"Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh says he will not seek to extend his presidency when his current term expires in 2013, according to reports. Mr Saleh, who has been in power for three decades, also pledged that he would not pass on power to his son. He spoke to parliament ahead of a rally in the capital on Thursday which, echoing protests in Tunisia and Egypt, has been dubbed a 'day of rage'."

Reuters says that:

"Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh, eyeing protests that threaten to topple Egypt's long-time ruler, indicated on Wednesday he would leave office when his current term ends in 2013, after three decades in power. Saleh, a key U.S. ally against al-Qaida, also vowed not to pass on the reins of government to his son and appealed to the opposition to call off protests as a large rally loomed.

" 'I present these concessions in the interests of the country. The interests of the country come before our personal interests,'' Saleh told his parliament, Shoura Council and members of the military."

Saleh's pledge is similar to that made last night by Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, who said he will not seek re-election later this year — but wants to remain in office until the next president is elected and sworn-in.

Mubarak's promise has not satisfied many protesters in this country. Watch for whether Saleh's statement calms tensions in Yemen.

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