America

Storm Story: 'Most Miserable Day Yet In A Relentless Winter'

Abandoned cars lined Chicago's Lake Shore Drive on Wednesday. i i

Abandoned cars lined Chicago's Lake Shore Drive on Wednesday. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Scott Olson/Getty Images
Abandoned cars lined Chicago's Lake Shore Drive on Wednesday.

Abandoned cars lined Chicago's Lake Shore Drive on Wednesday.

Scott Olson/Getty Images

There's no need to exaggerate when it comes to describing how awful the snow/ice/sleet/wind storm that spread from Oklahoma to Maine this week was for those in its path. So we'll let the local news outlets tell the tale:

Boston Globe: "Dozens of roofs collapsed throughout the state, scores of cars and tractor-trailers spun out on ice-slickened highways, and hundreds of flight cancellations, train delays, and other headaches resulted from yesterday's soggy onslaught of snow, sleet, and freezing rain. It was perhaps the most miserable day yet in a relentless winter."

Chicago Sun-Times: "After being stranded, pummeled and punished by a blizzard of historic proportions — complete with thunder and lightning — folks shoveling out from under nearly two feet of snow now face a deep freeze."

The Indianapolis Star: "Crews are still trying to clear roads, many schools remain closed, and thousands across Central Indiana don't have power."

The New York Times: "It was a terrible day for travel, whether by train, plane or automobile. More than 6,000 flights, about a fifth of the country's air traffic, were canceled on Wednesday, according to FlightAware.com, which tracks air travel. Amtrak shut down service between New York and Philadelphia during the morning rush hour, and canceled many trains in and out of Chicago. Not only were side roads closed by snow and ice, but Interstate highways also were shut down."

As for the forecast, the National Weather Service says:

"The major winter storm that brought 10 to over 20 inches of snow and almost an inch of ice to parts of the Central and Northeast states was moving through New England and will head off toward the Canada Maritimes tonight. Snow over the Great Lakes, Ohio Valley, and northern New England will gradually diminish overnight. Winds will also diminish across the Plains and central Rockies."

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.