America

'Day Of Rage' In Yemen; Rumsfeld's Memoir; Health Care Vote

Good morning.

We're keeping tabs on the latest news from Egypt, where it's feared there will be another day of violence in Cairo's Tahrir Square, in a live-blog posted here.

And we've rounded up the day-after reporting about the "Blizzard of 2011" in a post here.

Other stories making headlines this morning include:

— "Day of rage" In Yemen: "More than 20,000 anti-government protesters have gathered in the Yemeni capital, Sanaa, for a 'day of rage' against President Ali Abdullah Saleh," the BBC reports. "The demonstrators are calling for a change in government and rejected Mr Saleh's offer to step down in 2013 after more than 30 years in power."

— Cyclone Yasi Pummels Australia: "Hopes that shattered North Queensland communities had 'dodged a bullet' and avoided deaths or casualties in the wake of Cyclone Yasi's fury were dealt a blow this evening when Queensland police confirmed two men were missing from the area, south of Cairns," The Australian writes.

— Health Care Politics: "Efforts to repeal President Barack Obama's health care law died a quick death in the Senate Wednesday, but the GOP got a consolation prize — a bipartisan fix to a tax-reporting requirement in the law that was widely panned by businesses," Politico says.

— In Memoir, Rumsfeld Is "Largely Unapologetic": In a memoir due out next week, former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld "concedes he went too far" with some of the "tart" zingers he said over the years, The Washington Post reports. But "Rumsfeld still can't resist ... taking a few pops at former secretaries of state Colin L. Powell and Condoleezza Rice as well as at some lawmakers and journalists. He goes so far as to depict former president George W. Bush as presiding over a national security process that was marked by incoherent decision-making and policy drift, most damagingly on the war in Iraq."

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