International

Protests Grow In Bahrain, Iran

Hundreds of Bahrainis hold an anti-government protest near the capital Manama, on February 15, 2011. i i

Hundreds of Bahrainis hold an anti-government protest near the capital Manama, on February 15, 2011. ADAM JAN/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption ADAM JAN/AFP/Getty Images
Hundreds of Bahrainis hold an anti-government protest near the capital Manama, on February 15, 2011.

Hundreds of Bahrainis hold an anti-government protest near the capital Manama, on February 15, 2011.

ADAM JAN/AFP/Getty Images

Violence began anew in Bahrain today when police clashed with protesters attending the funeral of a fellow demonstrator shot to death Monday by riot police. NPR's Peter Kenyon tells NPR Newscasts Bahrain police confronted the protesters as they left the hospital carrying the man's body. The New York Times reports that's when a second protester was killed. Peter talked with Bahrain's Foreign Minister yesterday who said Bahrain has no policy of treating demonstrators harshly; Peter says that makes the police decision to attack the funeral procession "inexplicable".

Iran's government-controlled Press TV says Iranian lawmakers met in Tehran yesterday - to scream for the executions of opposition leaders. They blame former presidential candidates Mir Hossein Mousavi and Mehdi Karroubi for the death of one Iranian protester and the injuries of several others on Monday. They blame the United States and Israel for sponsoring yesterday's illegal rallies.

ITALIAN PRIME MINISTER INDICTED ON SEX CHARGE

Sister Eugenia Bonelli  criticizes Italian premier Silvio Berlusconi during a Rome protest on Sunday, Feb. 13, 2011. i i

Sister Eugenia Bonelli criticizes Italian premier Silvio Berlusconi during a Rome protest on Sunday, Feb. 13, 2011. Pier Paolo Cito/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Pier Paolo Cito/AP
Sister Eugenia Bonelli  criticizes Italian premier Silvio Berlusconi during a Rome protest on Sunday, Feb. 13, 2011.

Sister Eugenia Bonelli criticizes Italian premier Silvio Berlusconi during a Rome protest on Sunday, Feb. 13, 2011.

Pier Paolo Cito/AP

An Italian judge ruled Silvio Berlusconi will face a quick trial for allegedly hiring a 17-year-old prostitute and using his position as Italy's leader to hush up the alleged crime. The Guardian reports the case will be heard by a three judge panel, all of whom are women. NPR's Sylvia Poggioli tells Morning Edition as many as one million Italians, mostly women, filled streets in Rome and other cities Sunday, demanding his resignation over his sexist, offensive behavior. Berlusconi dismissed the march as leftist.

GLOOMY NEWS FROM THE NFL - THE SMALL PRINT MATTERS

NPR's Tom Goldman tells NPR Newscasts the NFL contract talks took an unsettling turn Monday when the National Football League filed an unfair labor practice complaint against the players' union. The NFL alleges the union isn't bargaining in good faith - a legal no-no. The league believes the players are secretly trying to dump their union. If that happened, the players wouldn't be unionized anymore and could make independent financial decisions: such as suing the NFL if the league locks them out before they go on strike. It's a complicated suspicion and Tom reports the players' union says there's absolutely no merit to the NFL's charge. The labor contract expires March 3.

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