International

Protests Spread To Libya

Libyan dissidents are the latest to call for a "Day of Rage' by way of a Facebook page. AFP reports protesters began by tussling with police in the eastern city of Benghazi, demanding the resignation of Libyan leader Moammar Gaddafi, who's run the country since 1969. Fourteen people were hurt and a local paper claimed 'saboteurs' were responsible.

The WSJ says Libya opposition activists chose tomorrow for the big protest day: on February 17, 1987, several young Libyans were publically executed for treason, and footage of their deaths was repeatedly televised.

MEANWHILE, BACK IN BAHRAIN

NPR's Peter Kenyon is in Bahrain and tells NPR Newscasts protesters have filled streets in Manama, demanding the prime minister's ouster. Police have stepped back, unlike earlier this week when they clashed with protesters who were trying to attend another protester's funeral; the clash killed at least two more demonstrators. Peter says the Bahraini government seems to recognize more confrontations lead to more violence.

HOW TO COMPLAIN IN SAUDI ARABIA

Online protests are growing in Saudi Arabia, where NPR's Deborah Amos is in Riyadh. She tells Newscast kingdom officials are worried about spreading unrest, so they've set up a Facebook 'complaint' website. Deborah discussed Saudi Arabia's social media troubles last month on All Things Considered, which you can see here.

The BBC is tracking protests in several countries, here. Don't forget our own Andy Carvin is reporting Twitter developments here.

ANOTHER REASON PEOPLE GET ANGRY - FOOD PRICES

The BBC reports the World Bank has released a study showing world food prices are up 15% since October, forcing 44 million people into poverty. The organization's Food Price Watch says food prices are at 'dangerous levels'.

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