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North Korea's Kim Jong Il's Birthday Greeted By 'Mysterious Natural Wonder'

North Korean students dance to celebrate the 69th birthday of their leader, Kim Jong Il, in the North Korean capital of Pyongyang. i i

hide captionNorth Korean students dance to celebrate the 69th birthday of their leader, Kim Jong Il, in the North Korean capital of Pyongyang.

Korean Central News Agency via AP
North Korean students dance to celebrate the 69th birthday of their leader, Kim Jong Il, in the North Korean capital of Pyongyang.

North Korean students dance to celebrate the 69th birthday of their leader, Kim Jong Il, in the North Korean capital of Pyongyang.

Korean Central News Agency via AP

Kim Jong Il celebrated his 69th birthday yesterday. And beyond all the formalities like letters of congratulations from the Russian, Syrian and Cuban presidents, Reuters reports that the official news agency also reported a "mysterious natural wonder," over the leader's birthplace.

Reuters reports the KCNA said:

"The bright sun rose up, throwing its brilliant rays and the area of the Paektusan Secret Camp turned into a fascinating picturesque of spring. Then rarely big and bright halo persisted in the sky above Jong Il Peak for an hour, starting at 09:30," it said.

On his Twitter feed, U.S. State Department Spokesman P.J. Crowley took a chance to note that on Kim's birthday, his son was not with him:

#KimJongIl's son attended an#EricClapton concert in Singapore? Actually, the #DearLeader himself would benefit from getting out more often.

Crowley followed up a few minutes later:

Of course, there is nothing preventing #KimJongIl from opening up #NorthKorea so his people could enjoy #Clapton, and maybe get more to eat.

That last part refers to the severe food shortage that has lead North Korea to send its diplomats in search for food aid.

In its story, Reuters also points out that Kim likely wasn't even born in North Korea. "Historians say it is more likely Kim ... was born in the Soviet Union where his father trained as anti-Japanese guerilla," Reuters reports.

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