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Lawyer For WikiLeaks' Assange Deliberately Misled Court, Judge Says

The ruling by a British judge that WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange can be extradited from the U.K. to Sweden, where he's wanted for questioning about rape accusations two women have made against him, is now online here (and we have a copy at the end of this post).

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange arrives for his extradition hearing at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court in London on Thursday. i i

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange arrives for his extradition hearing at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court in London on Thursday. Matt Dunham/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Matt Dunham/AP
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange arrives for his extradition hearing at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court in London on Thursday.

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange arrives for his extradition hearing at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court in London on Thursday.

Matt Dunham/AP

A few of the judge's key findings:

— "Looking at all the circumstances in the round, this person passes the threshold of being an 'accused' person and is wanted for prosecution."

— Assange's lawyer made "a deliberate attempt to mislead the court" by stating that the Swedish prosecutor had not previously tried to interview Assange.

"In fact this is untrue. He says he realised the mistake the night before giving evidence. He did correct the statement in his evidence in chief (transcript p.83 and p.97). However, this was very low key and not done in a way that I, at least, immediately grasped as significant. It was only in cross-examination that the extent of the mistake became clear. Mr Hurtig must have realised the significance of paragraph 13 of his proof when he submitted it. I do not accept that this was a genuine mistake."

According to The Guardian, "Assange will appeal, his legal team confirmed. If this is unsuccessful, he will be extradited to Sweden in 10 days."

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