International

Libya Update: U.S. Envoy Calls Gadhafi 'Delusional'

Libyan anti-government fighters sit by a fire to stay warm as they control a checkpoint on the outskirts of the southwestern town of Nalut, Libya,  Monday. The town is currently in control of the Libyan anti-government forces. i i

Libyan anti-government fighters sit by a fire to stay warm as they control a checkpoint on the outskirts of the southwestern town of Nalut, Libya, Monday. The town is currently in control of the Libyan anti-government forces. Lefteris Pitarakis/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Lefteris Pitarakis/AP
Libyan anti-government fighters sit by a fire to stay warm as they control a checkpoint on the outskirts of the southwestern town of Nalut, Libya,  Monday. The town is currently in control of the Libyan anti-government forces.

Libyan anti-government fighters sit by a fire to stay warm as they control a checkpoint on the outskirts of the southwestern town of Nalut, Libya, Monday. The town is currently in control of the Libyan anti-government forces.

Lefteris Pitarakis/AP

U.N. ambassador Susan Rice says that Lybian leader Moammar Gadhafi sounds "delusional," citing the ruler's interview with ABC's Christiane Amanpour Monday in which he said that the Libyan people love him. Gadhafi also denied using force to suppress demonstrations against his rule.

"When he can laugh in talking to American and international journalists while he is slaughtering his own people, it only underscores how unfit he is to lead and how disconnected he is from reality," Rice said.

According to a Newscast report by Ari Shapiro from the White House, Rice also repeated the Obama administration's view that Gadhafi needs to step aside. She spoke at the White House after the president met with U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon.

In Libya, pro-Gadhafi loyalists fought rebels holding the two cities closest to Tripoli. The AP reports that Gadhafi has warned tribal leaders that if rebels remain in Zawiya Tuesday, they will be attacked by military aircraft. The town is 30 miles west of Tripoli.

Here's a roundup of other updates on the crisis in Libya:

  • The Pentagon says it's shifting air and naval assets in case they're needed.
  • U.S. teams are heading to Libya's border to help cope with refugees, according to Secretary of State Clinton.
  • Installing a no-fly zone is one option, Clinton said Monday, adding that "No option is off the table."
  • Anti-government groups who control Benghazi have now set up their first leadership council.
  • Some $30 billion of Libya's assets have been frozen, according to the U.S. Treasury Department.
  • Libya's oil production is down by about 50 percent, according to officials. But news that some of Libya's ports have been reopened — and that Saudi Arabia will boost exports — helped ease some pressure on oil prices Monday.

And on a side note, Canadian singer Nelly Furtado says she will donate the $1 million she was paid by the Gadhafi regime for a short concert in 2007. Furtado made the announcement on her Twitter feed.

According to the AP, other performers who have been hired by the Gadhafi family include singers Beyonce, Usher, and Mariah Carey.

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