America

Other Headlines: Obama Returns, Israel Strikes Gaza

President Barack Obama walks across the White House's South Lawn with his family, returning from a Latin American trip on Wednesday, March 23, 2011. i i

President Barack Obama walks across the White House's South Lawn with his family, returning from a Latin American trip on Wednesday, March 23, 2011. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Carolyn Kaster/AP
President Barack Obama walks across the White House's South Lawn with his family, returning from a Latin American trip on Wednesday, March 23, 2011.

President Barack Obama walks across the White House's South Lawn with his family, returning from a Latin American trip on Wednesday, March 23, 2011.

Carolyn Kaster/AP

Here's a quick look at stories making headlines today:

President Obama is back in Washington today after a five-day trip to Latin America. Politico says he doesn't have much on his schedule. But as Frank writes for NPR's It's All Politics, Obama's certainly considering the sharp letter sent him by Speaker of the House John Boehner. The Speaker asks him to clarify his decision to intervene militarily in Libya.

The Jerusalem Post and al Jazeera say Israel attacked the Palestinian controlled territory of Gaza. The Post says Israel used tanks while al Jazeera says warplanes fired on the area. This comes after yesterday's deadly bus bombing in central Jerusalem. The BBC says a female British tourist died and 30 people were hurt.

Financial woes are spreading to Spain. Reuters says rating agency, Moody's, slashed ratings for 30 Spanish banks, but left alone Spain's three largest financial institutions. Moody's says it's harder for Spain to manage its debt and small banks are weaker. Trouble is brewing next door in Portgual; Prime Minister Jose Socrates quit after the Portuguese parliament refused to accept new spending cuts. The Wall Street Journal suggests Portugal may need a financial bailout like Greece and Ireland.

Dr. Conrad Murray. i i

Dr. Conrad Murray. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Damian Dovarganes/AP
Dr. Conrad Murray.

Dr. Conrad Murray.

Damian Dovarganes/AP

And the AP says a crowd of 320 prospective jurors will jam a Los Angeles courtoom today to begin the juror selection process for Dr. Conrad Murray. He's the personal physician for late pop star Michael Jackson, who's accused of gross negligence in giving Jackson a lethal narcotic and other sedatives that led to his death on June 25, 2009. The prospective jurors must complete a questionnaire of 125 pages and decide if they can spend two months participating in the trial.

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