International

At Cricket's World Cup, Tendulkar Denied His 100th 100; But India Wins

Sachin Tendulkar of India, right, bats as Kamran Akmal of Pakistan looks on earlier today (March 30, 2011). i i

hide captionSachin Tendulkar of India, right, bats as Kamran Akmal of Pakistan looks on earlier today (March 30, 2011).

Hamish Blair/Getty Images
Sachin Tendulkar of India, right, bats as Kamran Akmal of Pakistan looks on earlier today (March 30, 2011).

Sachin Tendulkar of India, right, bats as Kamran Akmal of Pakistan looks on earlier today (March 30, 2011).

Hamish Blair/Getty Images

If you understand our headline you already know more than we do.

But given that we do know just enough (because we've posted about him before) to understand that Indian superstar Sachin Tendulkar is in many experts' opinions "the best batsman ever to play cricket," we wanted to pass along word that:

"Tendulkar Falls Narrowly Short Of Hitting Hundredth 100 In Cricket World Cup Semi-Final." (The Telegraph)

He'll likely get another chance to record his "century century" this weekend. As we said last year, Tendulkar is accomplishing things on a par with Roger Bannister and the 4-minute mile — milestones others haven't reached.

Meanwhile, NPR's Corey Flintoff and Julie McCarthy reported for All Things Considered that the World Cup semifinal now underway between India and Pakistan has brought normal life to a standstill across the Asian subcontinent. And it's taken so seriously that "Pakistani Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani has accepted an invitation from his Indian counterpart, Manmohan Singh, to join him in watching the match from a VIP box," at the event, which is being held in the Indian border state of Punjab.

The Guardian is among the many news outlets live-blogging the India-Pakistan match.

Update at 1:15 p.m. ET. And The Winner Is:

India, by 29 runs. So, as the Guardian says, India makes it to the final.

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