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Mega Millions Winners Can Thank Some Rude Dude

The winners (left to right): Leon Peck, Kristin Baldwin, Mike Barth, New York Lottery's Yolanda Vega, Tracy Sussman, John Kutey, Gabrielle Mahar ad John Hilton. i i

The winners (left to right): Leon Peck, Kristin Baldwin, Mike Barth, New York Lottery's Yolanda Vega, Tracy Sussman, John Kutey, Gabrielle Mahar ad John Hilton. Mike Groll/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Mike Groll/AP
The winners (left to right): Leon Peck, Kristin Baldwin, Mike Barth, New York Lottery's Yolanda Vega, Tracy Sussman, John Kutey, Gabrielle Mahar ad John Hilton.

The winners (left to right): Leon Peck, Kristin Baldwin, Mike Barth, New York Lottery's Yolanda Vega, Tracy Sussman, John Kutey, Gabrielle Mahar ad John Hilton.

Mike Groll/AP

The seven New York State government workers who hit it big last week when they won a $319 million Mega Millions jackpot may be rich because of someone else's bad manners.

As Mike Barth (one of the winners) was waiting on line to buy the group's ticket, he reached over to pick up a Snickers bar. At that moment, the Albany Times Union reports "another man cut in front of him and bought" a chance of his own.

"Barth bought the next ticket, the nation's only jackpot winner for Friday's drawing," the Times Union says.

Karma.

The winners each get about $19 million after taxes.

As for our story yesterday about the 8th person who usually was part of the pool but decided not to this time, there are apparently at least a few more such unfortunate folks. According to the New York Post, at today's formal introduction of the winners "the group said there were some co-workers who had played in the past who chose not to play this time."

Karma II.

Update at 1:05 p.m. ET. Some folks have commented about the issue of whether the winners should share some of their good luck with co-workers who normally kicked in to the pool, but didn't this time. So, we wonder:

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