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In Japan: Radioactive Leak Stopped; New Steps Taken To Prevent Explosion

A destroyed bus still sits on a roof of a building in Ishinomaki, Miyagi prefecture. It settled there after the March 11 tsunami that swept over the coast. i i

A destroyed bus still sits on a roof of a building in Ishinomaki, Miyagi prefecture. It settled there after the March 11 tsunami that swept over the coast. Yasuyoshi Chiba /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Yasuyoshi Chiba /AFP/Getty Images
A destroyed bus still sits on a roof of a building in Ishinomaki, Miyagi prefecture. It settled there after the March 11 tsunami that swept over the coast.

A destroyed bus still sits on a roof of a building in Ishinomaki, Miyagi prefecture. It settled there after the March 11 tsunami that swept over the coast.

Yasuyoshi Chiba /AFP/Getty Images

The top of the news from Japan this morning is that "workers stopped a highly radioactive leak into the Pacific off Japan's flooded nuclear complex, but with the plant far from stabilized, engineers prepared an injection of nitrogen to deter any new hydrogen explosions." (The Associated Press)

From Tokyo, NPR's Joe Palca tells our Newscast desk that Tokyo Electric Power Co. used "liquid glass to stop at least one route the contaminated water was taking" from the Fukushima Dai-Ichi plant to the sea. At the same time, though, "the company continues to intentionally discharge mildly radioactive water from storage tanks at the plant" so that those containers can be used to store more highly contaminated water, Joe says.

On the leak

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On the leak

As for the push to prevent more explosions at the plant's crippled reactors, Joe says that workers are injecting nitrogen into a reactor vessel because that should work to prevent an explosion of hydrogen that's building up there.

On preventing another explosion

NPR's coverage of the crisis in Japan, where a March 11 earthquake and tsunami devastated much of the the nation's north-central coast, is collected here.

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