Must Reads

Lost Dr. Seuss Book Set To Be Published

Dr. Seuss reads to the cast of imprisoned, piano-playing boys in the 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T. i i

Dr. Seuss reads to the cast of imprisoned, piano-playing boys in the 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T. Columbia Pictures hide caption

itoggle caption Columbia Pictures
Dr. Seuss reads to the cast of imprisoned, piano-playing boys in the 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T.

Dr. Seuss reads to the cast of imprisoned, piano-playing boys in the 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T.

Columbia Pictures

Ten years ago, Dr. Seuss's art director Cathy Goldsmith was browsing through e-Bay, when she came upon magazine tear-sheets that purported to be stories from the superstar children's book author.

The seller was a Massachusetts dentist named Charles Cohen, who was so enamored with the work of Theodor Seuss Geisel, as Dr. Seuss was really called, that his house was filled with Seuss things. Goldsmith bought the magazines and not only contracted Cohen to write the book The Seuss, The Whole Seuss, and Nothing But the Seuss, but it turned out the stories were really written by Dr. Seuss and during his golden years, no less.

The Guardian reports:

The Bippolo Seed — described by the publisher as "the literary equivalent of buried treasure" — is lined up for publication in September. "These stories were published during what could arguably be called Dr Seuss's most fertile creative period, a time that would yield both Cat in the Hat and Grinch, a time when his theories about how to reach children through rhyme, rhythm, and a resonant combination of nonsense and sagacity, were coming into full bloom," [said Random House vice-president and publisher Kate Klimo]. "The stories are as good as anything in the already-published canon and readers of all ages are in for a treat."

The CBC reports that the new book includes stories like "Gustav the Goldfish, an early, rhymed version of A Fish Out of Water and The Strange Shirt Spot, which is similar to the bathtub-ring scene in The Cat in the Hat Comes Back. The title story features a cat who leads an innocent duck to make a bad decision."

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.