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Web Photos Of Bin Laden Corpse Are Fake

A screen grab of a younger Osama bin Laden, taken in Afghanistan on May 2, 2011. i i

hide captionA screen grab of a younger Osama bin Laden, taken in Afghanistan on May 2, 2011.

Majid Saeedi/Getty Images
A screen grab of a younger Osama bin Laden, taken in Afghanistan on May 2, 2011.

A screen grab of a younger Osama bin Laden, taken in Afghanistan on May 2, 2011.

Majid Saeedi/Getty Images

There are several gruesome photographs purporting to be the dead Osama bin Laden circulating on the internet. They're fake. The Guardian writes:

It appears the fake picture was initially published by the Middle East online newspaper themedialine.org on 29 April 2009, with a warning from the editor that it was "unable to ascertain whether the photo is genuine or not".

(Warning: the link opens to the horrific photographs.) The Guardian says at least four British papers put the bloody photographs up on their websites before the truth was revealed.

But there apparently are images of bin Laden's body. The Los Angeles Times reports U.S. troops photographed his body after he was killed and transmitted the images to analysts, who confirmed the identification. As Eyder writes, DNA analysis cited by the government shows that the body is bin Laden's.

A bin Laden photograph may still be released: speaking on C-Span's Washington Journal program, former CIA official Michael Scheuer suggested the Obama administration would eventually release an image. It would be similar to the decision to release photographs of the bodies of the sons of Iraq's Saddam Hussein to prove they were dead, as ABC writes.

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