Economy

Happy 40th To 'All Things Considered'

Turning 40 is a good thing when it's a news program you're talking about. It's a sure sign you must be doing a lot of things right.

Robert Conley, All Things Considered's first host, back in the day. i i

hide captionRobert Conley, All Things Considered's first host, back in the day.

NPR
Robert Conley, All Things Considered's first host, back in the day.

Robert Conley, All Things Considered's first host, back in the day.

NPR
Robert Conley, 85, last month in NPR's Studio 2A. i i

hide captionRobert Conley, 85, last month in NPR's Studio 2A.

Coburn Dukehart/NPR
Robert Conley, 85, last month in NPR's Studio 2A.

Robert Conley, 85, last month in NPR's Studio 2A.

Coburn Dukehart/NPR

Today, All Things Considered hits that mark.

As NPR's Susan Stamberg says of the show, which she co-hosted for 14 years in the '70s and '80s, "when we started, there was war in Vietnam, demonstrations against that war, the voting age was lowered to 18, the Beatles had broken up and in the air — as well as on our air in the early '70s — a sweetly notable absence of irony."

She celebrates the show's milestone with a look back at past All Things Considered anniversary reports. We'll add her report, which airs on the show today, to the top of this post later.

Also on the show today, you'll hear from hosts past and present throughout the program. We've stitched together their remarks:

ATC hosts

Loading…

ATC hosts

Meanwhile, for those interested in what the show sounded like on May 3, 1971, we've got some clips.

The original theme:

Theme music and introduction

The way original host Robert Conley introduced the show:

The first show's line-up

Conley's 4-plus minute talk about the anti-war protests that day in Washington:

Robert Conley on the day's big story

Some of the "sounds of the streets" that the show broadcast:

The sounds of the streets

And, that show's first 30 minutes:

The first half hour of the first All Things Considered

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: