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In Goodbye Note, Strauss-Kahn Denies Accusations

Dominique Strauss-Kahn, the IMF leader accused of sexual assault, sits in court May 16 at Manhattan Criminal Court in New York.

hide captionDominique Strauss-Kahn, the IMF leader accused of sexual assault, sits in court May 16 at Manhattan Criminal Court in New York.

Emmanuel Dunand/AP

In a goodbye message to his International Monetary Fund colleagues, Dominique Strauss-Kahn denied the sexual assault and rape charges he's facing. In the email, which was obtained by several news outlets including CNN and the AFP, he called what he is going through a "personal nightmare."

A lot of email details his work with the IMF, but here's the part of it that addresses his criminal case:

I wanted very much to be in touch with you, personally and directly, to express my profound sadness and frustration in having to leave under these circumstances. I am doing so because I believe it to be in the best interests of the institution that I care about so much, and of you, the staff, whom I deeply appreciate and admire.

The past days have been extremely painful for me and my family, as I know they have been for everyone at the Fund. I am very sorry that this has been the case. I deny in the strongest possible terms the allegations which I now face; I am confident that the truth will come out and I will be exonerated. In the meantime, I cannot accept that the Fund—and you dear colleagues—should in any way have to share my own personal nightmare. So, I had to go.

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