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German Airport Reopens As Volcanic Ash Starts To Dissipate

Cancelled flights are shown at Germany's Tegel Airport. Germany has now reopened airports after officials determined volcanic ash in the air was not critical. i i

hide captionCancelled flights are shown at Germany's Tegel Airport. Germany has now reopened airports after officials determined volcanic ash in the air was not critical.

Gero Breloer/AP
Cancelled flights are shown at Germany's Tegel Airport. Germany has now reopened airports after officials determined volcanic ash in the air was not critical.

Cancelled flights are shown at Germany's Tegel Airport. Germany has now reopened airports after officials determined volcanic ash in the air was not critical.

Gero Breloer/AP

Germany's main air traffic control office says ash from Iceland's Grimsvotn volcano is no longer critical, so airports in Bremen, Hamburg and Berlin have reopened, according to the BBC.

The move comes as Iceland's weather office reports the strength of the volcanic eruption is weaker. That's based on the height of Grimsvotn's volcanic plume and the amount of ash falling.

Air and Business Travel News says most affected airports are in Scotland, including Glasgow and Edinburgh.

Bloomberg News reports airlines are anxious to resume flights; British Airways is asking permission to travel in 'red zones', areas where skies could have ash. BA's CEO Willie Walsh says BA planes only want to fly where there's no dust, and he suggests the current banned zones are too strict.

The BBC says about 700 flights were cancelled in Germany today. The Guardian says about 500 flights were suspended yesterday across Europe as the ash cloud spread. Time is money: the AP notes the value of airline stocks dropped yesterday due in part to volcano-linked travel problems.

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