International

Fugitive Bosnian Serb Suspect Arrested In Serbia On Genocide Charges

Bosnian Serb military commander General Ratko Mladic visits troops in June, 1996. i i

Bosnian Serb military commander General Ratko Mladic visits troops in June, 1996. Anonymous/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Anonymous/AP
Bosnian Serb military commander General Ratko Mladic visits troops in June, 1996.

Bosnian Serb military commander General Ratko Mladic visits troops in June, 1996.

Anonymous/AP

Serbian President Boris Tadic says Serbian authorities have arrested former Bosnian Serb Army commander Ratko Mladic in Serbia. Mladic has been sought by the UN War Crimes Tribunal for genocide and other crimes committed during the Yugoslav war from 1992-1995.

Serbian Radio says Mladic was picked up after a secret tipoff. The Telegraph says the news broke just 15 minutes before the UN war crimes tribunal was poised to make a huge announcement - Serbia has failed to catch Mladic and co-suspect Goran Hadzic, who've been on the run for years In fact, Serbia's efforts were so bad that EUObserver reports the tribunal's declaration was expected to 'destroy' Serbia's chance of winning a chance to become a candidate for membership in the European Union.

Mladic is charged with leading the Srebrenica genocide, which the Guardian terms the worst European massacre since the Nazis' atrocities. At the end of the Bosnian war, the Bosnian Muslim men of Srebrenica fled to the hills to escape Mladic, reputed as a brutal psychopath.

They didn't get away.

Eight thousand were caught and butchered over a period of 10 days; the report notes the extraordinary planning and logistics needed to commit the atrocities. The UN War Crimes Tribunal notes Mladic's forces intended to wipe out the entire Muslim population in Srebrenca.

The Guardian is liveblogging the news. It has a link to the 15-count Mladic indictment, listing his alleged crimes along with former Bosnian leader Radovan Karadzic.

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