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Scorpion On A Plane: 'Oh My God,' Said Man Who Was Stung

So, you're trying to get some sleep as you fly from Seattle to Anchorage.

Something tickles your arm. You figure it's a small bug and try to brush it away.

Then you feel it again and look down.

"I picked my hand up and said, oh my God, that's a scorpion," Jeff Ellis of West Linn, Ore., tells Portland's Fox 12 about what happened to him aboard an Alaska Airlines flight on June 17.

Jeff Ellis of West Linn, Ore., snapped a photo of the scorpion that bit him during an Alaska Airlines flight. i i

hide captionJeff Ellis of West Linn, Ore., snapped a photo of the scorpion that bit him during an Alaska Airlines flight.

Rick Bowmer/AP
Jeff Ellis of West Linn, Ore., snapped a photo of the scorpion that bit him during an Alaska Airlines flight.

Jeff Ellis of West Linn, Ore., snapped a photo of the scorpion that bit him during an Alaska Airlines flight.

Rick Bowmer/AP

If the unsettling discovery wasn't scary enough, Ellis' left elbow started burning. It felt like a bee sting. And the flight was still 30 minutes away from Anchorage. According to Fox 12, "two doctors on board checked him out while the flight crew called for medics to meet the plane." The concern: if a person's allergic, such stings can cause anaphylactic shock.

The medics, according to Ellis, weren't sure at first what to do. As The Associated Press writes, "scorpions aren't common in Alaska."

"They had to Google it," Ellis says.

Fortunately, he didn't go into shock. His girlfriend, who was traveling with Ellis, "kept her feet on the seat for the rest of the flight, refusing to put them on the ground," Fox 12 says.

As for how the creature got aboard, the airline thinks it might have happened when the plane was in Austin, Texas.

Ellis, meanwhile, has gotten 4,000 frequent flier miles and two free round-trip tickets to wherever Alaska Airlines flies.

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