America

NATO Says Troops Killed In Afghanistan; National League Takes World Series

NATO says a suicide attack in Afghanistan has killed five foreign troops and wounded several Afghans, according to Reuters. There's no word on the nationality of the troops. The attack comes on the day Afghan President Hamid Karzai buried his brother, Ahmed Walid Karzai, who was assassinated yesterday. CNN reports an Afghan governor escaped an attack enroute to the service.

An oil pipeline in eastern Syria is burning and Reuters cites Syrian officials who say the blaze is under control. Syrian residents also said bomb blasts damaged two smaller gas pipelines along the country's border with Iraq. The AP says Syria produces some 350,000 barrels of oil every day.

Los Angeles city councilwoman and Democrat Janice Hahn defeated Republican businessman Craig Huey on Tuesday in the state's special congressional election to fill the seat of retiring Rep. Jane Harman. The Los Angeles Times shows Hahn winning 54.6% to 45.4% in unofficial results. Frank reviews the race on It's All Politics. On a somber note, Hahn also lost her mother, Ramona, late Monday night.

Film buffs appear to be unhappy over Netflix's decision to boost fees. The AP reports the movie rental company is raising rates by as much as 60%, 'provoking the ire of some of its 23 million subscribers'. The increase depends on whether you'd rather stream movies or get DVDs in the mail. People who used both methods paid one subscription fee. Now they'll have to sign up for two separate rental programs with different fees.

And the National League defeated the American League 5-1 in this year's All Star game. The aptly-named Prince Fielder of the Milwaukee Brewers hit a key three-run homer in the top of the fourth; he took home the Most Valuable Player award. As ESPN notes, Washington Nationals relief pitcher Tyler Clippard is credited with the win.

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