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Authorities Will Not File Charges Against Football Player In Saggy Pants Saga

Deshon Marman, the 20-year-old college football player who was kicked off a plane and arrested in San Francisco for his sagging pants, will face no charges related to the incident.

The San Francisco Chronicle reports:

... In a statement today, San Mateo County District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe said no charges would be filed against Marman.

"While we believe the officers on scene acted appropriately and professionally during the over one hour that they were in contact with Mr. Marman and repeatedly attempted to resolve the situation without difficulty, and while Mr. Marman could have quickly obviated the need for further intervention, we do not believe that criminal charges are warranted in light of all the circumstances surrounding the incident," Wagstaffe said.

In an image taken from an April 2011 video, provided by the University of New Mexico, Deshon Marman takes part in football practice in Albuquerque, N.M. i i

hide captionIn an image taken from an April 2011 video, provided by the University of New Mexico, Deshon Marman takes part in football practice in Albuquerque, N.M.

AP
In an image taken from an April 2011 video, provided by the University of New Mexico, Deshon Marman takes part in football practice in Albuquerque, N.M.

In an image taken from an April 2011 video, provided by the University of New Mexico, Deshon Marman takes part in football practice in Albuquerque, N.M.

AP

We've been following this story since Marman was arrested back in June, after a U.S. Airways employee asked him to pull his pants up, because they were "below his butt and his boxer shorts were showing." The story got more interesting in late June, after a U.S. Airways passenger revealed that just six days before Marman was arrested, the airline allowed a man wearing women's panties and thigh-high stockings to fly, despite complaints from other passengers.

Marman's mother, Donna Doyle, told the Chronicle she was pleased with the decision.

"I knew that my son hadn't done anything. It's just a process that we had to go through," Doyle told the Chronicle. "I'm saddened that the district attorney took so long to do so, but I'm grateful that they have come to this decision to not pursue anything because there was nothing to pursue."

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