International

French Government Reported To Struggle With Internet Copyright Complaints

More than 18 million allegations of copyright infringement have landed on the doorstep of Hadopi, the French agency charged with administering the country's "three strikes" law.

The news, as reported by Ars Technica, is that a mere 470,000 "first strike" e-mails have been sent to Internet users accused of breaking copyright law through file sharing.

In addition to a variety of teething issues for the new agency, set up after the passage of the Hadopi law in 2009, Ars quotes a spokesman saying that the government's goal is to change people's habits, not prosecute them:

"We don't want to prosecute people," said the spokesperson. "We just want to push people to change when, knowing it or not, they are committing piracy. So we're trying to give people the time to understand what they are doing and to change before prosecuting them."

It's not clear how many of France's 65 million citizens will be touched by Hadopi once the backlog of complaints is cleared since individual users can be the source of multiple alleged infringements.

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