America

It's So Hot That ...

Dealing with the dog days: This pooch in Manhattan found one way to stay cool Thursday (July 21, 2011). i i

Dealing with the dog days: This pooch in Manhattan found one way to stay cool Thursday (July 21, 2011). Timothy A. Clary /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Timothy A. Clary /AFP/Getty Images
Dealing with the dog days: This pooch in Manhattan found one way to stay cool Thursday (July 21, 2011).

Dealing with the dog days: This pooch in Manhattan found one way to stay cool Thursday (July 21, 2011).

Timothy A. Clary /AFP/Getty Images

Hot hot is it?

"#itssohot my makeup melted as I was applying it." (@sleepgh on Twitter.)

Or, "#itssohot my Iced Coffee cup says 'Caution: Hot Beverage' on it." (@number6six.)

Feel free to join that Twitter trend or give us your own "it's so hot" responses in our comments section.

With an estimated 150 million Americans, from the midsection through to the north and New England, now sweltering in temperatures that will hit or exceed 100 degrees, the heat is certainly on.

And we hate to have to say this, but NPR's Christopher Joyce tells the Newscast desk that there's no relief in sight for the central part of the nation for another eight to nine days, and that things won't cool off in most of the East for another four to five days.

Christopher Joyce

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Christopher Joyce

On Morning Edition, NPR's David Schaper spoke with a guy in Chicago who summed up how it feels in one word: "unbearable."

David Schaper

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David Schaper

According to the National Weather Service, "the highest heat index values are expected across parts of the Midwest, Ohio Valley and Mid-Atlantic, where they are forecast to be between 105 and 115 degrees through Friday, with locally higher values possible.

A couple dozen deaths have been attributed to the heat. We know we sound like your mom when we remind you again, try to take it easy. The Weather Service has heat safety tips and information posted here.

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