International

As Country Mourns, Norway Names Victims

People gather outside Oslo City Hall to participate in a "rose march" in memory of the victims of Friday's bomb attack and shooting massacre. i

People gather outside Oslo City Hall to participate in a "rose march" in memory of the victims of Friday's bomb attack and shooting massacre. Emilio Morenatti/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Emilio Morenatti/AP
People gather outside Oslo City Hall to participate in a "rose march" in memory of the victims of Friday's bomb attack and shooting massacre.

People gather outside Oslo City Hall to participate in a "rose march" in memory of the victims of Friday's bomb attack and shooting massacre.

Emilio Morenatti/AP

About 150,000 people filled the streets of Oslo, yesterday, to pay their respects to the victims of the bombing and shooting rampage.

Thousands of Norwegians held up flowers near the Nobel Peace Museum and vowed not retaliation, but to make their democracy stronger.

Two women carry roses tagged with the slogan "OsLove" as they joined as many as 150,000 people gathered for a flower vigil in Oslo. i

Two women carry roses tagged with the slogan "OsLove" as they joined as many as 150,000 people gathered for a flower vigil in Oslo. Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images
Two women carry roses tagged with the slogan "OsLove" as they joined as many as 150,000 people gathered for a flower vigil in Oslo.

Two women carry roses tagged with the slogan "OsLove" as they joined as many as 150,000 people gathered for a flower vigil in Oslo.

Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images

"Evil may kill a human being, but it will never conquer a nation," Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg told the crowd. "Revenge is a natural reaction. But, we, in Norway shall not hate, we shall not seek revenge. We shall stand together in our sorrow."

As that scene played out, police started to formally release the names of some of the 76 people killed.

Norway's NRK, Britain's Sky News and The Daily Mirror have created pages where they are collecting photos and brief biographies of the dead.

Among them:

— 21-year old Tore Eikeland, whom the Prime Minister called "one of our most talented young politicians."

— Monica Bosei, 45, known as the mother of Utøya island, who was running to warn others about the shooter when she was shot herself.

— Tarald Mjelde, 18, who was described by a friend as "the little boy with an enthusiasm that infects everyone around you."

— Ismail Haji Ahmed, 20, who was a dancer on the Norwegian version of the talent show X-Factor.

— Simon Saebo, 18, who was an up-and-coming politician who was given the nickname JFK.

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