America

While Susquehanna River Is Receding, Residents Can't Return Just Yet

Chris Colligan stood Thursday on a flooded street in Port Deposit, Md. i i

Chris Colligan stood Thursday on a flooded street in Port Deposit, Md. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Patrick Semansky/AP
Chris Colligan stood Thursday on a flooded street in Port Deposit, Md.

Chris Colligan stood Thursday on a flooded street in Port Deposit, Md.

Patrick Semansky/AP

Flooding continues along the Susquehanna River in Pennsylvania, New York State and down into Maryland continues.

But as headlines from around the region show, the worst may be over.

Still, there's no word yet on when an estimated 100,000 people who had to leave their homes will be able to return.

Some of the stories:

— "Floodwaters Start To Recede." (The Press & Sun-Bulletin in Binghamton, N.Y.)

— "Floodwaters Begin Fall From Late Thursday Peaks." (The Times-Tribune in Scranton, Pa.)

— In Maryland, "the river was forecast to crest at Conowingo dam at 8 p.m. Friday — 10 hours earlier than earlier predictions." (The Baltimore Sun)

— "The damage was concentrated along the Susquehanna in Wilkes-Barre [Pa.] and dozens of miles up the river in Binghamton, N.Y." (The Associated Press)

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