America

World Series Game 1: The Coolest And Biggest Plays

A cool out: Pitcher Chris Carpenter of the St. Louis Cardinals tags first base for an out as Elvis Andrus of the Texas Rangers reaches the base. i i

A cool out: Pitcher Chris Carpenter of the St. Louis Cardinals tags first base for an out as Elvis Andrus of the Texas Rangers reaches the base.

Jamie Squire/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Jamie Squire/Getty Images
A cool out: Pitcher Chris Carpenter of the St. Louis Cardinals tags first base for an out as Elvis Andrus of the Texas Rangers reaches the base.

A cool out: Pitcher Chris Carpenter of the St. Louis Cardinals tags first base for an out as Elvis Andrus of the Texas Rangers reaches the base.

Jamie Squire/Getty Images

Game 1 of the World Series went to the St. Louis Cardinals last night. The National League champions beat the American League's Texas Rangers 3-2:

For those who like to know about the key moments, here are two, courtesy of NPR's Tom Goldman's report for Morning Edition:

The coolest play came in the first inning. Cards pitcher Chris Carpenter covered the bag at first base, and had to dive to the ground to get the ball tossed his way by first baseman Albert Pujols. "Carpenter dove for the ball and as his long frame hit the ground he tagged the base with his glove hand, at the same time pulling his pitching hand away to protect it from the batter's oncoming cleats," Tom says. "How cool to see a pitcher getting dirty."

The play, Tom added, "served notice that the game, perhaps the Series, is going to be a diving for every out, clawing for every run affair."

The biggest play came in the sixth inning when Cardinals manager Tony LaRussa sent pinch hitter Allen Craig to the plate in place of Carpenter. Craig's hit to right field was dropped by Ranger outfielder Nelson Cruz. That drove in the winning run. LaRussa's savvy use of his bench and bullpen came through again.

Game 2 is tonight in St. Louis. It starts at 8 p.m. ET, on Fox.

Tom Goldman on 'Morning Edition'

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