America

Occupy Oakland Camp Deserted As Police Move In

In Oakland early today, police officers formed a line before entering the Occupy Oakland protest site. i

In Oakland early today, police officers formed a line before entering the Occupy Oakland protest site. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Paul Sakuma/AP
In Oakland early today, police officers formed a line before entering the Occupy Oakland protest site.

In Oakland early today, police officers formed a line before entering the Occupy Oakland protest site.

Paul Sakuma/AP

"Hundreds of police officers raided the Occupy Oakland tent city" early this morning, the Oakland Tribune reports, but there were few if any people there:

"There's no one in the tents, it seems empty. ... It seems about 30-40 tents were taken down in anticipation of the raid."

The scene in Oakland was much different last week, when violence broke out as protesters and police clashed.

Meanwhile, up the coast in Portland, Ore., protesters are considering how to regroup after being cleared from two downtown parks on Sunday, The Oregonian reports. According to The Associated Press, "more than 50 protesters were arrested in the police action, but officers did not use tear gas, rubber bullets or other so-called non-lethal weapons, police said."

The AP also says there were 19 occupy-related arrests in Salt Lake City over the weekend and 24 arrests in Albany, N.Y.

In other occupy-related news, The New York Times this morning follows up on earlier reporting about the noise at the original Occupy Wall Street protest site in Manhattan. As we've said, the drum circles there have been a source of many complaints. The Times adds that there's another noise problem in the neighborhood: "the near-constant din of construction emanating from the World Trade Center site, which has often started before dawn and gone on past 2 a.m."

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