America

Looking Back: How The World Quickly Learned About Bin Laden's Death

Iconic image: President Barack Obama and members of his national security team as they monitored the mission to capture or kill Osama bin Laden. i i

hide captionIconic image: President Barack Obama and members of his national security team as they monitored the mission to capture or kill Osama bin Laden.

Pete Souza/White House
Iconic image: President Barack Obama and members of his national security team as they monitored the mission to capture or kill Osama bin Laden.

Iconic image: President Barack Obama and members of his national security team as they monitored the mission to capture or kill Osama bin Laden.

Pete Souza/White House

One year ago today, we learned that al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden had been located and killed by U.S. Navy SEALs at a compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan.

There's no shortage of stories and news related to that event, including these:

— "After Bin Laden, Al-Qaida Still Present As Movement." (NPR's Dina Temple-Raston, on Morning Edition.)

— Army's Combating Terrorism Center To Post Online Documents Seized From Bin Laden's Compound, Issue Short Report. (CTC)

— "Bin Laden: Seized Documents Show Delusional Leader And Micromanager." (CNN National Security Analyst Peter Bergen.)

— "Bin Laden's Last Stand: In Final Months, Terrorist Leader Worried About His Legacy." (The Washington Post)

We were thinking back about how the story unfolded a year go, and scanned over our live blogging that Sunday night and Monday morning. A few things of note about a night when the news moved very quickly:

— It was around 10:30 p.m. ET last May 1 when word started to leak.

— By 11:30 p.m. ET or so, a crowd was already gathering outside the White House; changing "USA!"

— At 11:38 p.m. ET, President Obama confirmed the news. "Good evening," he began. "Tonight, I can report to the American peopleand to the world that the United States has conducted anoperation that killed Osama bin Laden, the leader of alQaeda, and a terrorist who's responsible for the murder ofthousands of innocent men, women, and children."

— Just before midnight ET, former President George W. Bush issued a statement saying, in part, that "this momentous achievement marks a victory for America, for people who seek peace around the world, and for all those who lost loved ones on September 11, 2001."

— It was around 3:15 a.m. ET, May 2, when we learned that bin Laden's body had already been buried at sea.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: