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The Bee's Knees: There's A New Spelling Champion

  • With confetti falling, Snigdha Nandipati, 14, is embraced by her brother, Sujan Nandipati, after she won the National Spelling Bee with the word "guetapens" Thursday.
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    With confetti falling, Snigdha Nandipati, 14, is embraced by her brother, Sujan Nandipati, after she won the National Spelling Bee with the word "guetapens" Thursday.
    Jacquelyn Martin/AP
  • Emma Ciereszynski, 14, of Dover, N.H., shrugs after misspelling a word in the finals of the contest.
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    Emma Ciereszynski, 14, of Dover, N.H., shrugs after misspelling a word in the finals of the contest.
    Jacquelyn Martin/AP
  • Lena Greenberg, 14, of Philadelphia, is eliminated during the finals Thursday.
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    Lena Greenberg, 14, of Philadelphia, is eliminated during the finals Thursday.
    Alex Brandon/AP
  • Sam Lowery, of Charlestown, Mass., spells his word in the air during Round 2 of the National Spelling Bee in Oxon Hill, Md., on Wednesday.
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    Sam Lowery, of Charlestown, Mass., spells his word in the air during Round 2 of the National Spelling Bee in Oxon Hill, Md., on Wednesday.
    Evan Vucci/AP
  • Vanya Shivashankar, 10, of Olathe, Kansas, spells a word during the semifinals on Thursday.
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    Vanya Shivashankar, 10, of Olathe, Kansas, spells a word during the semifinals on Thursday.
    Jacquelyn Martin/AP
  • Spelling contestants walk back onto the stage for the third round of the National Spelling Bee in Oxon Hill, Md., on Wednesday.
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    Spelling contestants walk back onto the stage for the third round of the National Spelling Bee in Oxon Hill, Md., on Wednesday.
    Jacquelyn Martin/AP
  • Nathan Dugan, of Canton, Ohio, spells "cantankerous."
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    Nathan Dugan, of Canton, Ohio, spells "cantankerous."
    Evan Vucci/AP
  • Lena Greenberg, 14, of Philadelphia, spells out a word in the air.
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    Lena Greenberg, 14, of Philadelphia, spells out a word in the air.
    Jacquelyn Martin/AP
  • Jae Canetti of Fairfax, Va., concentrates on his word "habendum" during the semifinal round on Thursday.
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    Jae Canetti of Fairfax, Va., concentrates on his word "habendum" during the semifinal round on Thursday.
    Evan Vucci/AP
  • Mignon Tsai, 12, of Abbotsford, British Columbia, Canada, reacts as she misspells a word during Round 5 of the semifinals on Thursday.
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    Mignon Tsai, 12, of Abbotsford, British Columbia, Canada, reacts as she misspells a word during Round 5 of the semifinals on Thursday.
    Jacquelyn Martin/AP
  • Abigail Violet Spitzer of El Paso, Texas, reacts after spelling her word "tondino" correctly during Thursday's semifinal round.
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    Abigail Violet Spitzer of El Paso, Texas, reacts after spelling her word "tondino" correctly during Thursday's semifinal round.
    Evan Vucci/AP
  • Despite looking nervous, Simola Nayak, 13, of DeKalb County, Ga., spells a word correctly in Round 5 of the semifinals on Thursday.
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    Despite looking nervous, Simola Nayak, 13, of DeKalb County, Ga., spells a word correctly in Round 5 of the semifinals on Thursday.
    Jacquelyn Martin/AP
  • Vismaya Kharkar, 13, of Bountiful, Utah, is jubilant after spelling "allothogenic" correctly.
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    Vismaya Kharkar, 13, of Bountiful, Utah, is jubilant after spelling "allothogenic" correctly.
    Evan Vucci/AP

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Snigdha Nandipati, 14, of San Diego has been crowned the champion in the 2012 Scripps National Spelling Bee. Her winning word was "guetapens," a French-derived word for "an ambush, snare or trap."

A very calm Snigdha beat eight other finalists, including her last competitor, Stuti Mishra, 14, of West Melbourne, Fla. Stuti got tripped up on the word "schwarmerei."

The winner got $30,000 in cash, a trophy, a $2,500 savings bond, a $5,000 scholarship, $2,600 in reference works from the Encyclopedia Britannica and an online language course.

A group of us here at NPR (including our copy chief Susan Vavrick) watched and live-chatted the Bee. You can read our conversation below:

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