America

From Curiosity, Another Martian Landscape

NASA has released two more pictures from the Curiosity Mars rover.

One is a color image that shows that wall of the Gale Crater and the other is a close up shot of the area excavated by the rover's descent stage rocket engines.

We've posted the white-balanced version of the photos. In theory those should appear more like what Mars would look like if you were using your eyes.

This image of the crater wall is north of the landing site, or behind the rover. Here, a network of valleys believed to have formed by water erosion enters Gale Crater from the outside. This is the first view scientists have had of a fluvial system - one relating to a river or stream — from the surface of Mars. i i

hide captionThis image of the crater wall is north of the landing site, or behind the rover. Here, a network of valleys believed to have formed by water erosion enters Gale Crater from the outside. This is the first view scientists have had of a fluvial system - one relating to a river or stream — from the surface of Mars.

NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS
This image of the crater wall is north of the landing site, or behind the rover. Here, a network of valleys believed to have formed by water erosion enters Gale Crater from the outside. This is the first view scientists have had of a fluvial system - one relating to a river or stream — from the surface of Mars.

This image of the crater wall is north of the landing site, or behind the rover. Here, a network of valleys believed to have formed by water erosion enters Gale Crater from the outside. This is the first view scientists have had of a fluvial system - one relating to a river or stream — from the surface of Mars.

NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS
With the loose debris blasted away by the rockets, details of the underlying materials are clearly seen. Shown in the inset in the figure are pebbles up to 1.25 inches across (upper two arrows) and a larger clast 4 inches long protruding up by about 2 inches  from the layer in which it is embedded.

hide captionWith the loose debris blasted away by the rockets, details of the underlying materials are clearly seen. Shown in the inset in the figure are pebbles up to 1.25 inches across (upper two arrows) and a larger clast 4 inches long protruding up by about 2 inches from the layer in which it is embedded.

NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Also of note: The Wall Street Journal has started stringing together a 360-degree view of the place where Curiosity landed. It's still incomplete, but the paper is adding photos as they come in.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: