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Power's Still Out For Many After Isaac, And They're Boiling

Kids in New Orleans on Monday getting some relief from the heat thanks to ice being distributed to those without power. i i

Kids in New Orleans on Monday getting some relief from the heat thanks to ice being distributed to those without power. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Mario Tama/Getty Images
Kids in New Orleans on Monday getting some relief from the heat thanks to ice being distributed to those without power.

Kids in New Orleans on Monday getting some relief from the heat thanks to ice being distributed to those without power.

Mario Tama/Getty Images

Check this fresh headline from The Times-Picayune in New Orleans:

"Public's anger at lengthy power outage after Isaac boils over."

According to the newspaper, after six days of camping outside in sweltering temperatures because Hurricane Isaac knocked out power last week, there are many angry folks in the city and surrounding parishes.

"What burns my ass is there's no reason in the world it should have to be like this," Melvin Odenwald of Algiers Point told the newspaper. His house, according to the Times-Picayune, "is well above 100 degrees after six days without power."

The newspaper adds that:

"As of 6 p.m. Monday, Entergy had restored power to 89.6 percent of the homes and businesses in New Orleans that lost it after the storm, leaving 16,772 still in the dark. In Jefferson Parish, just 69 percent of power has been restored, with 52,566 left to go.

"A 90-year-old man without power at his home died of heat stroke in Jefferson Parish, where Parish President John Young has been the loudest critic of Entergy's 'snail's pace' response to Isaac, a Category 1 hurricane."

According to The Associated Press, as of Monday evening "more than 100,000 people without power" in Louisiana and "thousands also were without power in Mississippi and Arkansas."

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