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Malala Stands For First Time Since Being Shot By Taliban, Doctors Say

Demonstrators in Islamabad at a protest earlier this week about Malala Yousafzai's shooting. i i

Demonstrators in Islamabad at a protest earlier this week about Malala Yousafzai's shooting. Aamir Qureshi /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Aamir Qureshi /AFP/Getty Images
Demonstrators in Islamabad at a protest earlier this week about Malala Yousafzai's shooting.

Demonstrators in Islamabad at a protest earlier this week about Malala Yousafzai's shooting.

Aamir Qureshi /AFP/Getty Images

Where To Send Messages To Malala:

Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, England, has a webpage with information about how to send cards, letters and gifts to Malala, and links to an online message board and updates about her condition.

The address for cards letters or gifts is:

"For Malala"
c/o Pakistan Consulate Birmingham
2-26 Constitution Hill
Hockley
Birmingham, B19 3LY

Malala Yousafzai, the 15-year-old Pakistani girl who spoke out against the Taliban and was shot in the head by one of its gunman for her bravery, "has stood for the first time since her attack," ITV News, The Associated Press and other news outlets are reporting.

They're getting that word from doctors at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, England, where Malala is being treated for the injuries she received 10 days ago when she was attacked near her home in Pakistan's Swat Valley. The doctors just briefed reporters, as the BBC reports on its Twitter page.

The hospital adds on the webpage it has created for updates on Malala's condition that she is "comfortable and stable."

The hospital also has a webpage with information on how to get cards, donations and messages to Malala. The attack on her has sparked outrage in Pakistan and grabbed headlines around the world.

Update at 9:20 a.m. ET. Malala Is Writing Again:

As Larry Miller reports for the NPR Newscast, doctors also said today that Malala is able to write. She can't speak because of tubes going down her throat, but is communicating with the help of a pen and pad.

Larry Miller reporting

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