Morning roundup

Top Stories: Missiles For Turkey; Inflation In Check; Egypt Prepares To Vote

A supporter of the opposition to Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi was playing soccer near a Republican Guard tank earlier today  outside the presidential palace in Cairo. Egyptians are being called to vote over the next two weekends in a referendum on a draft constitution. i i

hide captionA supporter of the opposition to Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi was playing soccer near a Republican Guard tank earlier today outside the presidential palace in Cairo. Egyptians are being called to vote over the next two weekends in a referendum on a draft constitution.

Patrick Baz /AFP/Getty Images
A supporter of the opposition to Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi was playing soccer near a Republican Guard tank earlier today  outside the presidential palace in Cairo. Egyptians are being called to vote over the next two weekends in a referendum on a draft constitution.

A supporter of the opposition to Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi was playing soccer near a Republican Guard tank earlier today outside the presidential palace in Cairo. Egyptians are being called to vote over the next two weekends in a referendum on a draft constitution.

Patrick Baz /AFP/Getty Images

Good morning.

Our early headlines:

Syrian Crisis: Turkey Getting Patriot Missiles, Some U.S. Troops To Operate Them.

Inflation Is In Check; Consumer Prices Fell 0.3 Percent In November.

In Repeat Of Disturbing News, Man With Knife Attacks School Children In China.

Some of the day's other top stories:

— "What North Korea's Rocket Launch Tells Us About Iran's Role." (Morning Edition)

— "Russia's Stance On Syria 'Will Not Change.' " (BBC News)

— "Constitution Vote Won't End Egypt's Crisis." (Morning Edition)

— "UBS In Talks over $1 Billion Penalty." (The Wall Street Journal)

— Ambassador Susan Rice: "Why I Made The Right Call." (The Washington Post)

— "Obama, Boehner Closer To Cliff's Edge." (The Hill)

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