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Wild Weather Warning: Tornadoes, Heavy Snows, High Winds

Where is spring? Icy branches partially blocked a city street Wednesday in Sioux Falls, S.D. More wintry weather is expected there Thursday.

Where is spring? Icy branches partially blocked a city street Wednesday in Sioux Falls, S.D. More wintry weather is expected there Thursday. Dirk Lammers /ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

itoggle caption Dirk Lammers /ASSOCIATED PRESS

While a "Minnesota winter that won't end is expected to dump up to a foot of snow in the Twin Cities by Thursday night," people in Missouri and Arkansas are "grappling with the aftermath of a series of storms that spawned at least two tornadoes."

And the wild weather is spreading to other parts of the nation:

"A cold front will continue to advance eastward Thursday into Thursday night bringing a threat of severe thunderstorms from the upper Ohio Valley to the Gulf Coast and the Carolinas. Damaging straight-line winds in excess of 60 mph, large hail and a few tornadoes are possible," warns The Weather Channel.

Our colleagues at Minnesota Public Radio say there could be some "thundersnow" up their way today.

From St. Louis Public Radio: Tim Lloyd reports on the severe weather

South Dakota's Argus Leader says that "tens of thousands of residents in southeastern South Dakota remained without power Wednesday as they hunkered down for the second wave of a record-setting winter storm that already downed power lines, snapped large trees and closed roads, schools and businesses."

There's a state of emergency in Missouri after Wednesday's storms, reports St. Louis Public Radio. Cleveland's Plain Dealer says there may be some flooding Thursday in northern Ohio.

And the National Weather Service writes that:

"Another round of severe weather is expected for Thursday across the eastern Ohio and Tennessee River Valleys as well as the southern Mid-Atlantic and Southeast U.S. The primary threats will be damaging winds, tornadoes and large hail. At this time, it appears the greatest risk may be focused across portions of Alabama, Georgia and the Florida Panhandle.

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