International

Gas Leak Suspected After Dozens Injured By Blast In Prague

Glass and other debris were  scattered across the street Monday after an explosion in Prague. Authorities initially suspected a gas leak. Dozens of people were injured in the Czech capital. i i

Glass and other debris were scattered across the street Monday after an explosion in Prague. Authorities initially suspected a gas leak. Dozens of people were injured in the Czech capital. Martin Mraz /EPA /LANDOV hide caption

itoggle caption Martin Mraz /EPA /LANDOV
Glass and other debris were  scattered across the street Monday after an explosion in Prague. Authorities initially suspected a gas leak. Dozens of people were injured in the Czech capital.

Glass and other debris were scattered across the street Monday after an explosion in Prague. Authorities initially suspected a gas leak. Dozens of people were injured in the Czech capital.

Martin Mraz /EPA /LANDOV

An explosion at an office building in the the Czech capital on Monday injured at least several dozen people and may have left some victims trapped in rubble.

The early thinking was that a natural gas leak led to the disaster in the center of Prague, police spokesman Tomas Hulan said, according to The Associated Press.

Radio Free Europe reported that "Prague's mayor, Bohuslav Svoboda, was quoted as saying from the scene that there were fears that 'three or so' people might still be inside the structure." While the AP was initially saying that "up to 40 people" were injured, CNN was reporting that fire officials said "at least 55 people" were hurt.

"The blast occurred in a building near the National Theater, not far from the Vltava River," Radio Free Europe said. It added that "the explosion shattered the windows of nearby buildings and was reportedly heard a kilometer away."

We'll monitor reports about the explosion and update as developments warrant.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.