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As Tropical Storm Andrea Heads North, East Coast Is Drenched

The Eastern Seaboard is getting drenched this morning, as Tropical Storm Andrea moves north along the coast.

Check out this rainfall map put out by the Weather Prediction Center:

A map showing the amount of rainfall forecast during the next 24 hours. i i

A map showing the amount of rainfall forecast during the next 24 hours. National Weather Service hide caption

itoggle caption National Weather Service
A map showing the amount of rainfall forecast during the next 24 hours.

A map showing the amount of rainfall forecast during the next 24 hours.

National Weather Service

It shows that in the next 24 hours, a wide swath of the Mid-Atlantic will get hammered with about 3 inches of rain and New York may see close to 4 inches.

While the storm has lost some steam — maximum sustained winds are 45 mph — the National Hurricane Center has still posted tropical storm warnings from South Carolina through Virginia.

The Center adds that the system is racing northeast at 28 mph and the big concern here is water.

USA Today reports:

"What remains of Andrea will continue to move north up the East Coast on Friday and Saturday. Locally heavy rain, brief gusty winds and a flooding risk are all possible from the Southeast coast to New England, according to AccuWeather meteorologist Alex Sosnowski.

"Disruptive downpours could occur Friday around Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York City, Boston, Hartford, Providence, and Portland, Maine. Indications are that most locations in this swath will be in for a 2- to 4-inch rainfall, but locally heavier amounts are possible, Sosnowski reports."

As Bill reported, Andrea, the first named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season, made landfall on Florida's Big Bend area, last night.

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