International

France's Marion Bartoli Wins Women's Title At Wimbledon

France's Marion Bartoli celebrates her women's singles championship at The All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club in Wimbledon. i i

hide captionFrance's Marion Bartoli celebrates her women's singles championship at The All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club in Wimbledon.

Dominic Lipinski /PA Photos/Landov
France's Marion Bartoli celebrates her women's singles championship at The All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club in Wimbledon.

France's Marion Bartoli celebrates her women's singles championship at The All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club in Wimbledon.

Dominic Lipinski /PA Photos/Landov

Marion Bartoli of France won the women's singles title at Wimbledon on Saturday, defeating Germany's Sabine Lisicki in straight sets, 6-1, 6-4.

It's Bartoli's first "Grand Slam" title.

Sports Illustrated was posting "live analysis" through the match. At the end, it wrote that:

"Marion Bartoli is your 2013 Wimbledon champion! Well deserved.

"Looking at the stats, the one number that stands out is this one: Lisicki won just 52 percent of her first serve points. Just an anemic serving performance from Lisicki today, who was clearly overwhelmed by the occasion. That's tough to see, but it's also nice to see experience rewarded. This was Bartoli's time. Lisicki will have many more shots at this title, no doubt about it.

"Bartoli looks absolutely stunned. She really doesn't know what to do. After shaking the umpire's hand she sprints to her box and after a precarious climb, finds her father Walter and gives him a huge."

Bartoli, 28, was ranked No. 15 in the world coming into The Championships at Wimbledon. Lisicki, 23, was ranked No. 24.

The men's final is Sunday. As we wrote earlier, Scotland's Andy Murray hopes to be "the first male British player to raise the Wimbledon trophy since Fred Perry ... in 1936." Murray is ranked No. 2 in the world. His opponent, Novak Djokovic of Serbia, is ranked No. 1.

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