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Teresa Heinz Kerry's Condition Improves

"Teresa Heinz Kerry continues to improve and remains in fair condition at Massachusetts General Hospital, while doctors seek the cause of seizure-like symptoms she experienced on Sunday," State Department spokesman Glen Johnson says in a statement sent to reporters Tuesday afternoon.

Teresa Heinz Kerry and her husband John, the secretary of state, in February. i i

Teresa Heinz Kerry and her husband John, the secretary of state, in February. Jason Reed /Reuters /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Jason Reed /Reuters /Landov
Teresa Heinz Kerry and her husband John, the secretary of state, in February.

Teresa Heinz Kerry and her husband John, the secretary of state, in February.

Jason Reed /Reuters /Landov

In the most extensive comments so far about her condition, Johnson also says that:

"As evaluations continue, she, Secretary of State John Kerry, and their family are deeply grateful that physicians have ruled out a variety of possible triggers or other ailments, including heart attack, stroke, or a brain tumor."

Heinz Kerry is 74. Until this year, her husband was a senator from Massachusetts. In 2004, he was the Democratic Party's presidential nominee.

According to The Associated Press, "Heinz Kerry was taken to the emergency room in Nantucket, accompanied by her husband, after 3:30 p.m. Sunday. A hospital spokesman said she arrived at that facility in critical condition."

WBUR reminds readers that:

"Heinz Kerry previously said she found out in September 2009 that she had cancer in her left breast after having her annual mammogram. A month later, she underwent lumpectomies on both breasts at a Washington hospital after doctors also discovered what they thought was a benign growth on her right breast. ...

"In November 2009, Heinz Kerry had another pair of lumpectomies performed at Massachusetts General Hospital."

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