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In Egypt: 'Day Of Rage' Adds To Body Count

  • Egyptians supporting ousted president Morsi pause during clashes with security forces near the Four Seasons hotel in Garden City area of Cairo on Wednesday. Thousands of Morsi supporters took to the streets, urging a "Day of Rage" to denounce the deaths of hundreds of protesters this week.
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    Egyptians supporting ousted president Morsi pause during clashes with security forces near the Four Seasons hotel in Garden City area of Cairo on Wednesday. Thousands of Morsi supporters took to the streets, urging a "Day of Rage" to denounce the deaths of hundreds of protesters this week.
    Hamid Sanah/EPA/Landov
  • Smoke rises over Ramses Square after protests turned violent across Egypt. The government has imposed a night-time curfew set to last at least a month.
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    Smoke rises over Ramses Square after protests turned violent across Egypt. The government has imposed a night-time curfew set to last at least a month.
    Steve Crisp/Reuters/Landov
  • An Egyptian civilian (left) offers water to policemen during clashes with protesters in Cairo.
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    An Egyptian civilian (left) offers water to policemen during clashes with protesters in Cairo.
    AFP/Getty Images
  • Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi chant slogans during a protest in Ramses Square in Cairo on Friday. Today's estimated death toll ranges from 60 according to the Associated Press and 95 according to Al Jazeera.
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    Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi chant slogans during a protest in Ramses Square in Cairo on Friday. Today's estimated death toll ranges from 60 according to the Associated Press and 95 according to Al Jazeera.
    Khalil Hamra/AP
  • Muslim Brotherhood supporters clash with police near Ramses square. The army deployed dozens of armored vehicles on major roads in Cairo, and the Interior Ministry has said police will use live ammunition against anyone threatening state installations.
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    Muslim Brotherhood supporters clash with police near Ramses square. The army deployed dozens of armored vehicles on major roads in Cairo, and the Interior Ministry has said police will use live ammunition against anyone threatening state installations.
    Mosaab El Shamy/EPA/Landov
  • Members of the Muslim Brotherhood and Morsi supporters flee from shooting in front of Azbkya police station during clashes at Ramses Square.
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    Members of the Muslim Brotherhood and Morsi supporters flee from shooting in front of Azbkya police station during clashes at Ramses Square.
    Amr Abdallah Dalsh/Reuters/Landov
  • A wounded man is evacuated during clashes between security forces and Morsi supporters in Cairo.
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    A wounded man is evacuated during clashes between security forces and Morsi supporters in Cairo.
    Khalil Hamra/AP
  • Demonstrators carry a wounded man after clashes with police near Ramses Square in Cairo.
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    Demonstrators carry a wounded man after clashes with police near Ramses Square in Cairo.
    Khaled Elfiqi/EPA/Landov
  • Supporters carry posters of Morsi and shout slogans during a march in Alexandria.
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    Supporters carry posters of Morsi and shout slogans during a march in Alexandria.
    AFP/Getty Images
  • Soldiers take their positions on armored vehicles while guarding an entrance to Tahrir Square in Cairo. Wednesday's crackdown left more than 600 people dead and nearly 4,000 injured.
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    Soldiers take their positions on armored vehicles while guarding an entrance to Tahrir Square in Cairo. Wednesday's crackdown left more than 600 people dead and nearly 4,000 injured.
    Hassan Ammar/AP
  • Morsi supporters march toward Old Cairo as they carry a coffin, covered with a national flag, of someone killed during Wednesday's clashes.
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    Morsi supporters march toward Old Cairo as they carry a coffin, covered with a national flag, of someone killed during Wednesday's clashes.
    Amr Nabil/AP

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(We updated the top of this post at 4:50 p.m. ET. For other updates, click here.)

With the Muslim Brotherhood marching in Cairo and other Egyptian cities in a "day of rage" over the deadly crackdown on supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi, this week's alarming body count went higher on Friday.

"A lot of Egyptians were worried" there would be more bloodshed, NPR Cairo Bureau Chief Leila Fadel said on Morning Edition, and that's just what happened.

Government forces fired tear gas and there were reports of gunshots as well. Around 3 p.m. ET, The Associated Press reported that Egyptian security officials were saying at least 60 people had been killed so far — 52 civilians and eight police officers. By 4:30 p.m. ET, Reuters was saying that "around 50 people had been killed in Cairo alone on Friday." As 4:50 p.m. ET, al-Jazeera had the death toll as "at least 95." (News outlets' figures will vary because of the danger and difficulty of reporting on the day's events and getting reliable information from authorities.)

Earlier in the day, NPR's Peter Kenyon said on Morning Edition that there is "a lot of anger and determination on both sides."

The Muslim Brotherhood and its supporters are not only still upset that Morsi was removed from office by the nation's military last month, but also are furious about Wednesday's attacks by security forces on those gathered in pro-Morsi sit-ins. The crackdown left more than 600 people dead and nearly 4,000 injured.

Meanwhile, the military and Egypt's interim government are saying they will use live ammunition against protesters who attack public property or security personnel.

The grim results of the week's violence are front and center in this report from NPR's Cairo bureau chief, Leila Fadel: "Scene From A Cairo Mosque Turned Morgue."

Some of the morning's related headlines include:

— "Egypt Braces For Fresh Violence." (CBS News)

— "Smell Of Death Lingers In Cairo's Iman Mosque." (Al Jazeera)

— "Egypt's Christians Terrified After Church Attacks." (Agence France-Presse)

UPDATES

4:50 p.m. ET. At Least 60, Possibly More Than 95 Dead:

The Associated Press quotes security officials as saying "at least 60" people have been killed in Friday's violence, while al-Jazeera says it's "at least 95" dead with "hundreds injured."

1:15 p.m. ET. 80 Dead?

"In the worst of the violence, a correspondent for Al Jazeera said at least 80 people were killed and hundreds injured in Cairo's Ramses Square on Friday as anti-coup protesters were fired on by government forces." The BBC is reporting that "at least 38 people have been killed in Egypt, officials say."

"It appears a lot of people have died in there," NPR's Leila Fadel says of that square in Cairo. "It's completely chaotic at this point."

11:30 a.m. ET. Death Toll Rises:

According to Reuters, "at least 27 people were killed in Cairo on Friday during a protest by supporters of deposed President Mohammed Morsi, said a Reuters witness who counted their bodies. The bodies were laid out in a mosque near the protest in Ramses Square."

10:25 a.m. ET. Thousands Moving Away From Ramses Square:

Earlier on Friday he had seen "thousands of men walking toward Cairo's Ramses Square," NPR's Peter Kenyon just told Morning Edition. Now, after the sounds of gunfire, clouds of tear gas and some fatalities, "there's a very large crowd coming back out of the square."

Some of those in the area, adds NPR's Leila Fadel, have had to jump from a relatively low bridge to get away.

9:55 a.m. ET. More Than A Dozen Deaths:

Egyptian officials say at least 17 people have been killed so far today, The Associated Press reports.

9:30 a.m. ET. Some Deaths, Some Tear Gas, Some Shots:

There have already been at least a few fatalities today, Al Jazeera reports. Also, on Reuters' webcast there have been scene of tear gas clouds floating over protesters in Cairo.

NPR's Leila Fadel reports from Cairo that "we're hearing gunfire throughout the city."

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