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'Twerk' Sashays Into Oxford's Online Dictionary, 'Srsly'

Singers Miley Cyrus and Robin Thicke during Sunday night's MTV Video Music Awards in New York. Her twerking raised many eyebrows. i i

hide captionSingers Miley Cyrus and Robin Thicke during Sunday night's MTV Video Music Awards in New York. Her twerking raised many eyebrows.

Lucas Jackson /Reuters/Landov
Singers Miley Cyrus and Robin Thicke during Sunday night's MTV Video Music Awards in New York. Her twerking raised many eyebrows.

Singers Miley Cyrus and Robin Thicke during Sunday night's MTV Video Music Awards in New York. Her twerking raised many eyebrows.

Lucas Jackson /Reuters/Landov

Miley Cyrus isn't responsible, though this week she certainly did introduce a lot of us old folks to "twerking":

"Twerk" is one of several dozen words or phrases that Oxford Dictionaries Online has added to it website.

Oxford's definition for the verb: "Dance to popular music in a sexually provocative manner involving thrusting hip movements and a low, squatting stance." The origin? "Probably an alteration of WORK."

Among the other additions:

— "Dappy ... silly, disorganized, or lacking concentration." As in: "Those Two-Way bloggers sure are dappy."

— "Derp ... used as a substitute for speech regarded as meaningless or stupid, or to comment on a foolish or stupid action." As in: "Another Two-Way post about Miley Cyrus? Derp."

— "Squee ... used to express great delight or excitement." As in: "The Two-Way hopes to take Labor Day off. Squee!"

— "Srsly ... short for SERIOUSLY." As in: "Srsly, Mr. Memmott?"

There's also "badassery," which doesn't show up among the 43 new additions in Oxford's announcement. Time, though, spotlighted it and a search of Oxford's website does reveal that badassery was added this month. The definition:

"Behaviour, characteristics, or actions regarded as intimidatingly tough or impressive."

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