International

WATCH: Surfers Ride Towering Waves In Portugal

Brazilian surfer Carlos Burle rides a big wave at the Praia do Norte, north beach, at the fishing village of Nazaré in Portugal's Atlantic coast on Monday. i i

Brazilian surfer Carlos Burle rides a big wave at the Praia do Norte, north beach, at the fishing village of Nazaré in Portugal's Atlantic coast on Monday. Miguel Barreira/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Miguel Barreira/AP
Brazilian surfer Carlos Burle rides a big wave at the Praia do Norte, north beach, at the fishing village of Nazaré in Portugal's Atlantic coast on Monday.

Brazilian surfer Carlos Burle rides a big wave at the Praia do Norte, north beach, at the fishing village of Nazaré in Portugal's Atlantic coast on Monday.

Miguel Barreira/AP

Here we go again: As a massive storm brings hurricane force winds through Western Europe, surfers in Nazaré, Portugal were taking advantage of monster waves, triggering rumors of record-breaking rides.

As we've reported, if there is a place to break the record for riding the tallest wave, it's in Nazaré. Back in January, when there were rumors of record-breaking rides, Scott reported that a deep, undersea canyon points massive waves toward the town.

The videos emerging from what happened at Nazaré on Monday are spectacular:

The Guardian reports that British surfer Andrew Cotton and the Brazilian Carlos Burle are claiming that they have taken advantage of the perfect conditions to break the 78-foot record set by American Garrett McNamara in Nazaré back in November of 2011.

"They were absolutely giant waves," Cotton told The Guardian. "I don't know how you would even begin to measure them. It was really exciting, a big day."

The Guardian adds that back in 2011, Cotton towed McNamara on a jet ski to the record-breaking wave. On Monday, McNamara towed Cotton to what could be his historic ride.

As Scott explained, measuring is an imperfect science. The Guardian says "the record will be announced in May next year, at the Billabong XXL awards."

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.